COVID-19 information
/
For the latest updates, please visit our coronavirus (COVID-19) website:
Filter

We've finished transcribing our Ward 8 Women's Voter Registers from 1920 and have added them into an easily accessible, searchable, and sortable dataset.

Melnea Agnes Cass dedicated her life to improving the world around her. Read more about the early life of this Boston champion.

Join us on a photo tour of Boston during the Blizzard of '78.

Among the 50,000 women who registered to vote in Boston in 1920, a large number worked in various occupations in the city’s department stores.

The Boston City Archives is thrilled to announce that it has been selected as the recipient of a $39,155 Recordings at Risk grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources. The grant will...

For decades, wage-earning women and female students called the Franklin Square House in Boston’s South End home. In 1920, over a hundred of these residents claimed their new right to register to vote...

What exactly did these endeavoring women have to bring with them to successfully register as a voter?

Many of the women in Lower Roxbury and the South End registering to vote for the first time in 1920 supported themselves and their families working at the United Drug Co. factory.

Among the 50,000 women who registered to vote in Boston in 1920, a large number living in the South End were women of color.

Mary Eliza Mahoney registered to vote in Boston’s Ward 13 on August 18, 1920, the very same day that Tennessee ratified the women’s suffrage amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Maria L. Baldwin, a prominent African American educator, civil rights activist, and suffragist in Boston, signed up to vote in the fall of 1920.

We've finished transcribing our Ward 13 Women's Voter Registers from 1920 and have added them into an easily accessible, searchable, and sortable dataset.

In the 1970s, Wilhelmina Crosson, Boston teacher and education advocate, and artist and activist James Henderson told their stories to Boston 200 oral history interviewers

In the 1970s, housing activist Anna Cole and Reverend Richard Owens, pastor of the People's Baptist Church, shared their stories with the Boston 200 oral history project.

In the mid 1970s, Jessie Gideon Garnett, Boston's first Black, woman dentist shared her story with the Boston 200 oral history project.

Have you ever walked by a Hero Square and wondered who it was named for? The City Archives is digitizing the documentation for Boston's Hero Squares. Now, you can learn more about the squares, parks...

In 1920, over 50,000 newly enfranchised women registered to vote in Boston.

From watching a game at Fenway Park to sailing on the Charles River, summers in Boston are defined by a variety of activities and customs. In Boston’s North End neighborhood, summers revolve around...

Following the flow of residents from Boston’s Chinatown to the South End in the mid-20th century, Harry Dow and Richard Chin describe a history of cohesion, dispersion, flexibility, and resistance in...

Boston’s neighborhoods are made up of diverse populations each with their own specific histories. Bostonians who emigrated to the City bring their traditions with them. These traditions are often...

On this day, in 1918, two sailors housed at Boston’s Commonwealth Pier reported to the sickbay with the flu. These two men signaled the beginning of the second deadly wave of the Spanish Flu.

Culture is woven throughout the fabric of Boston’s diverse neighborhoods. Across the City, family and friends gather to mark holiday, familial, and religious occasions. For residents, creating a space...

Bostonians have been using public transit systems since the late 19th century. Street-level systems featured streetcars and trolleys that traveled down the center of Boston’s busy streets while a...

Since the late 19th century, Boston’s transportation system has been on the move, always changing to fit the needs of residents.

In the first part of our two-part series on the role of community in Boston’s neighborhoods, we explored how community members work together to transform spaces like buildings and City blocks into...

In the first of a two-part series about the role of community in Boston’s neighborhoods, we look at how bonds and history are created between neighbors, and how community members ensure that their...

As the temperatures rise in Boston, the arrival of summer is all but confirmed. Recreation, much like the idea of summer, is nearly universal and Boston’s neighborhoods have consistently provided...

Boston has long been known for its commitments to education. Teacher Wilhelmina Crosson exemplified those commitments in her groundbreaking work advocating for under-served students. Crosson's work...

When Jessie Gideon Garnett first showed up at Tufts University’s School of Dental Medicine, she was told by a dean that her acceptance must have been a mistake.

On November 9, 1872, the Great Fire of Boston destroyed more than 1,000 businesses in Boston’s downtown area.

Back to top