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By Anna Boyles Shoe maker, shoe stitcher, shoe worker, shoe inspector, machine operator, topmaker, and eyeleter — these are some of the shoe industry-related occupations that women reported when they...

We've finished transcribing our Ward 2 Women's Voter Registers from 1920 and have added them into an easily accessible, searchable, and sortable dataset.

by Anna Boyles The 1880 United States Census reports that roughly fifty-percent of immigrants from Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island settled in Massachusetts, while nearly thirty-percent of New...

In Boston's Ward 10, over 800 women registered to vote between August 12 and October 13, 1920. We have finished transcribing the Ward 10 Women’s Voter Registers and the data is now available at...

In 1917, Boston's first female bootblacks fought Mayor Curley and Boston's City Council to save their jobs.

In Dorchester's Ward 11, over 1500 women registered to vote between August 12 and October 13, 1920. We have finished transcribing the Ward 11 Women’s Voter Registers and the data is now available at...

by Anna Boyles Boston women’s voter registrations from 1920 reveal that a number of women migrated from southern states to make neighborhoods such as the South End and Lower Roxbury their home...

We've finished transcribing our Ward 1 Women's Voter Registers from 1920 and have added them into an easily accessible, searchable, and sortable dataset.

by Anna Boyles On October 4, 1920. Sarah Stites and Helen Hodge left their Queensberry Street home in Boston to register to vote together. While transcribing women voter registers from 1920, members...

Who were the women artists who claimed their right to vote in 1920s Boston?

We've finished transcribing our Ward 8 Women's Voter Registers from 1920 and have added them into an easily accessible, searchable, and sortable dataset.

Melnea Agnes Cass dedicated her life to improving the world around her. Read more about the early life of this Boston champion.

Among the 50,000 women who registered to vote in Boston in 1920, a large number worked in various occupations in the city’s department stores.

The Boston City Archives is thrilled to announce that it has been selected as the recipient of a $39,155 Recordings at Risk grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources. The grant will...

For decades, wage-earning women and female students called the Franklin Square House in Boston’s South End home. In 1920, over a hundred of these residents claimed their new right to register to vote...

What exactly did these endeavoring women have to bring with them to successfully register as a voter?

Many of the women in Lower Roxbury and the South End registering to vote for the first time in 1920 supported themselves and their families working at the United Drug Co. factory.

Among the 50,000 women who registered to vote in Boston in 1920, a large number living in the South End were women of color.

Mary Eliza Mahoney registered to vote in Boston’s Ward 13 on August 18, 1920, the very same day that Tennessee ratified the women’s suffrage amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Maria L. Baldwin, a prominent African American educator, civil rights activist, and suffragist in Boston, signed up to vote in the fall of 1920.

We've finished transcribing our Ward 13 Women's Voter Registers from 1920 and have added them into an easily accessible, searchable, and sortable dataset.

In the 1970s, Wilhelmina Crosson, Boston teacher and education advocate, and artist and activist James Henderson told their stories to Boston 200 oral history interviewers

In the 1970s, housing activist Anna Cole and Reverend Richard Owens, pastor of the People's Baptist Church, shared their stories with the Boston 200 oral history project.

In the mid 1970s, Jessie Gideon Garnett, Boston's first Black, woman dentist shared her story with the Boston 200 oral history project.

Have you ever walked by a Hero Square and wondered who it was named for? The City Archives is digitizing the documentation for Boston's Hero Squares. Now, you can learn more about the squares, parks...

In 1920, over 50,000 newly enfranchised women registered to vote in Boston.

From watching a game at Fenway Park to sailing on the Charles River, summers in Boston are defined by a variety of activities and customs. In Boston’s North End neighborhood, summers revolve around...

Following the flow of residents from Boston’s Chinatown to the South End in the mid-20th century, Harry Dow and Richard Chin describe a history of cohesion, dispersion, flexibility, and resistance in...

Boston’s neighborhoods are made up of diverse populations each with their own specific histories. Bostonians who emigrated to the City bring their traditions with them. These traditions are often...

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