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How to change your voter status from inactive to active

How to change your voter status from inactive to active

If your voter status is inactive, you'll need to change it back to active before you can vote. There are three reasons this may have happened.

Last updated: 6/27/16
Step
1

Before you get started

If you moved out of the City and haven't registered in your new town, you'll be listed as an inactive voter.

You can still vote in Boston with your old address, but you can only vote in state elections and primaries only. You have a six-month grace period before you have to register your new address.

Step
2

Register in person on election day

Go to your old polling location in Boston and talk with the clerk at the check-in table. You'll need to show your ID to prove your new address. They'll give you a few forms to fill out:

  • the Affirmation of Current and Continuous Residence, which shows your new address, and
  • a new Voter Registration Form, which registers you in your new town.

You can complete these forms and leave them with the clerk. You can still vote at that polling location, but you’ll vote in your new town for future elections.

Step
3

Or register for the next election

The easiest way to update your information is to visit the state’s Voter Registration website. You'll need:

  • a valid driver's license, learner's permit, or State ID with your new address, and
  • a signature on file with the Registry of Motor Vehicles.

You can also register by mail. Print out and complete this voter registration form. Make sure to include your new address and town. Then, mail it to your local Elections office or Town clerk.

Step
1

Before you get started

If you moved within the City and didn't respond to the Annual Listing of Residents, you'll be listed as an inactive voter. You need to register at your new address before you can vote.

In the future, you can avoid the hassle by responding to the Annual Listing of Residents. We mail this form to Boston residents every year. It takes just a few minutes to respond, and you can do it online or over the phone.

Step
2

Register in person on election day

Go to your old polling location in Boston and talk with the clerk at the check-in table. You'll need to show your ID to prove your new address. They'll give you a few forms to fill out:

  • the Affirmation of Current and Continuous Residence, which shows your new address, and
  • a new Voter Registration Form, which registers you in your new neighborhood.

You can complete these forms and leave them with the clerk. You can still vote at that polling location, but you’ll vote in your new neighborhood for future elections.

Step
3

Or register for the next election

If you don't want to vote at this election, you can register as a new voter for the next one. There are several ways to do this. Learn how to register at your new Boston address.

Step
1

Before you get started

If you didn't respond to the Annual Listing of Residents, you'll be listed as an inactive voter. You need to register at your new address before you can vote.

In the future, you can avoid the hassle by responding to the Annual Listing of Residents. We mail this form to Boston residents every year. It takes just a few minutes to respond and you can do it online or over the phone.  

Step
2

Register in person on election day

Go to your polling location and talk with the clerk at the check-in table. You'll need to show your ID to prove your current address.

You have to fill out The Affirmation of Current and Continuous Residence, which states that you haven't move from your home. After you fill out the form, you can vote.

Contact:
Election
1 City Hall Square, Room 241
Boston, MA 02201
United States