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Boston Public Library announces literary events, programs for Black History Month

February 1, 2017

Boston Public Library

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Library

The February literary events and programs include lectures by authors whose works cover various genres.

book collage
Boston Public Library’s February literary events and programming include lectures by authors whose works cover various genres, and the Library honors Black History Month with films, discussions, activities, story times, and more.
Author talks:

Stephen Puleo speaks about his book American Treasures: The Secret Efforts to Save the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Gettysburg Address on Wednesday, February 1, at 6 p.m.  in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.

Join Boston thriller writers Hank Phillippi Ryan and Peter Swanson for “Twists, Turns, and Double Crosses” on Thursday, February 2, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

Margaret Fortier gives a lecture “Andiamo! Finding Your Italian Family” on Wednesday, February 15, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.

Therese Sellers, author of Alpha Is for Anthropos: an Ancient Greek Alphabet, will read from her book and lead participants in designing and painting medallions inspired by the beautiful illustrations on Wednesday, February 22, at 2 p.m. at the South End Branch. Located at 685 Tremont Street. Especially for children - tweens, ages 8-14.

Christina Baker Kline discusses Piece of the World, which explores the life of Christina Olson, a lifelong resident of Cushing, Maine, sufferer of polio, and an American icon as the subject of the Andrew Wyeth painting Christina’s World on Wednesday, February 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

Join bestselling authors Eloisa James, Lauren Willig, and Sarah MacLean for a romance fiction panel to discuss their works on Tuesday, February 28, at 6:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

Black History Month programming:Black History Month collage

Passage at St. Augustine Screenings & Discussion: The award-winning documentary tells the story of those who fought the 18-month battle that led directly to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The discussions will be led by filmmaker Clennon L. King and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones.

Kids’ Art Club explores and responds to the contributions of artists such as the Gees Bend quilters, Faith Ringgold, and Jean Michel Basquiat on Tuesdays at 4:30 p.m. during the month of February at the Adams Street Branch, located at 690 Adams Street.

Celebrate Black History Month with stories about African Americans who have made their marks on history, music, and more on Saturday, February 4, at 11 a.m. and on Saturday, February 25 at 11 a.m. in the Central Library in Copley Square’s Children’s Library.

A showing of the film Selma and a discussion of how the past relates to the present takes place on Thursday, February 9, at 5 p.m. at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue in Dorchester.

Explore the BPL’s print and online resources to aid in researching African American history on Wednesday, February 15, at 2 p.m. in the Community Learning Center Classroom at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

On Tuesday, February 21, at 3 p.m., Michele Brooks leads an art workshop in which participants will make MLK Jr.-inspired peace and unity collages (for ages 5-12) at the Roslindale Branch, located at 4246 Washington Street. The same workshop takes place on Wednesday, February 22, at 11 a.m. at the West Roxbury Branch, located at 1961 Centre Street.

Celebrate Black History Month with Janice Allen on Tuesday, February 21, at 3:30 p.m. at the Central Library in Copley Square’s Children’s Library, located at 700 Boylston Street. Janice uses her melodic voice and percussion instruments to engage the audience in stories through song.

The film Men of Honor will be shown on Thursday, February 23, at 2 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. The film tells the story of Carl Brashear, the first African American U.S. Navy Diver, and the man who trained him. Part of the Never Too Late Series.

The Living Archive: African American Poetry, a series of panel discussions by poets and writers examining a range of topics that include the importance and significance of African American literature, takes place on Thursday, February 23, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

American storyteller and cultural lecturer Desiree Taylor gives a presentation “Dreams Deferred: Stories of Hope through an African American Lens” on Thursday, February 23, at 6:30 p.m. at the West Roxbury Branch, located at 1961 Centre Street.

A screening of Never Give Up: Ama’s Journey to Freedom on the Underground Railroad, followed by a discussion, takes place on Monday, February 27, at 3 p.m. for children in grades 5-10 at the Lower Mills Branch, located at 27 Richmond Street.

Children are invited to a jazzy story time on Tuesday, February 28, at 10:30 a.m. to celebrate the contributions of African American musicians to American culture at the Lower Mills Branch, located at 27 Richmond Street.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit the Boston Public Library website.

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