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Boston Public Library to hold March author talks, Shakespeare commemorative programs

March 1, 2017

Boston Public Library

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Library

Boston Public Library’s March author talks and programs include celebrations of poetry, Women’s History Month, Shakespeare, new works, and more.

March book collage
Boston Public Library’s March author talks and programs include celebrations of poetry, Women’s History Month, Shakespeare, new works, and more:
  • Joseph Luzzi’s lecture “From Twain to Toni Morrison: A Literary Journey through America” leads participants through the fascinating world of American literature, revealing the character and conflicts of the American spirit on Thursday, March 2, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lectures Series.
  • Ellen B. Alden discusses her work Your Faithfully, Florence Burke, the story of her great-great-grandfather’s struggle as an Irish immigrant in America, on Saturday, March 11, at 12 p.m. at the Fields Corner Branch, located at 1520 Dorchester Avenue, and on Monday, March 27, at 6:30 p.m. at the Adams Street Branch, located at 690 Adams Street in Dorchester.
  • Stephen Kinzer reads from his new book True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire on Tuesday, March 14, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes Series.
  • In celebration of Women’s History Month, author and historian Kate Clifford Larson discusses the lives of Harriet Tubman, Mary Surratt, and Rosemary Kennedy, the subjects of her critically-acclaimed biographies on Thursday, March 16, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • The Friends of the South Boston Branch hold a book sale on Saturday, March 18, at 10 a.m. at the South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway.
  • Stephen Kurkjian shares passages from Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled off the World’s Greatest Art Heist on Monday, March 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the East Boston Branch, located at 365 Bremen Street.
  • Reginald Dwayne Betts reads from his two critically-acclaimed collections of poetry, Shahid Reads His Own Palm and Bastards of the Reagan Era, discusses the power of language, and examines the important intersection of art and social justice on Wednesday, March 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lectures Series.
  • Noam Maggor, author of Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age, discusses his work on Tuesday, March 28, at 6:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Gish Jen reads from her new book Girl at the Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap on Tuesday, March 28, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes series.

All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library commemorates the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. From September 2016 to June 2017, discover the Bard’s lasting legacy with dozens of programs system wide connecting audiences to theater and the dramatic arts.

March Shakespeare programs:

  • Shakespeare to Hip Hop: Hip hop poet and actor Marlon Carey and slam poetry champion and educator Regie Gibson team up with musicians to create an energetic literary performance combining poetry, spoken word, story, song, and rap on Friday, March 3, at 12 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Nicole Galland celebrates Shakespeare in her part lecture, part performance “The Play’s the Thing: Shakespeare on Stage” on Monday, March 6, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lectures Series.
  • Erika Bailey, American Repertory Theater Institute Head of Voice and Speech, offers tips and tutorials for effective public speaking on Tuesday, March 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Tour the Library’s Shakespeare Unauthorized exhibition with Curator Jay Moschella on Thursday, March 9, at 2 p.m. and on Thursday, March 23, at 2 p.m. in the McKim Exhibition Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. The exhibition is on view through March 31.
  • Visit the Children’s Library for activity stations that celebrate Shakespeare’s work on Saturday, March 11, at 3 p.m. in the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Marlon Carey and Regie Gibson perform Shakespeare’s sonnets and soliloquies for all ages on Tuesday, March 14, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Children make various styles of masks over the course of a three-week workshop with Boston Puppeteers Cooperative for ages 6 and older beginning Thursday, March 16, at 3:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Megan Hinckley, American Repertory Theater Director of Development, discusses the process of fundraising for nonprofit theater organizations on Tuesday, March 21, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Gnomeo and Juliet will be shown on Sunday, March 26, at 2 p.m.in the Children’s Library at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Seven Times Salt performs “Easy as Lying: Music of Shakespeare’s” on Sunday, March 26, at 2:30 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Children ages 8 and older discuss Unstoppable Octobia May on Friday, March 31, at 3:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

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