Back to top

Boston Public Library Receives Library Services and Technology Act Grant from Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners

November 10, 2016

Boston Public Library

Published by:

Library

Youth will work with Raspberry Pi, Scratch, Little Bits, Minecraft, and Python programming language. The grant runs from October 2016 through September 2017.

Teen Central at Boston Public Library’s Central Library in Copley Square was awarded a Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant for $7,500 from the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners (MBLC), and is partnering with the John D. O’Bryant School of Math and Science and the South End Technology Center to develop engineering programs for 7th and 8th grade students.

The programs are offered to 300 7th and 8th graders and take place twice monthly at the South End Technology Center, Teen Central at the Central Library in Copley Square, and/or at the John D. O’Bryant School of Math and Science. Youth will work with Raspberry Pi, Scratch, Little Bits, Minecraft, and Python programming language. The grant runs from October 2016 through September 2017.

“I am excited about this grant because it networks several institutions critical to advancing student preparation and youth development – Boston Public Library, Boston Public Schools, and a powerful community-based organization in the South End Technology Center,” said Rahn Dorsey, Chief of Education for the City of Boston. “This is what learning should look like for our young people.  Learning in Boston should take full advantage of the city’s assets, should extend beyond traditional classrooms, and should incorporate technology and the modern tools needed to prepare the city’s young people for thriving futures.”

“We are grateful to the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners for this grant and are confident teens will explore engineering concepts in a supportive environment, while learning from their peers and working hands-on with tools to broaden their understanding of engineering and technology,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

“We’re thrilled about the grant and for the opportunity to collaborate with the John D. O’Bryant School of Math and Science and the South End Technology Center,” said Jessi Snow, Teen Services Team Leader, Teen Central. “The project will be a great benefit to the 7th and 8th graders who will be participating in the engineering programs and building critical skills.”

Libraries use LSTA grants from the MBLC in a variety of ways, including implementing literacy programs that benefit all ages, increasing library access to underserved populations, providing advanced automation services, training staff, and preserving valuable historical documents.

In addition to the direct library grant program, the MBLC uses LSTA funds to support statewide programs and services, including summer reading programs, databases, the Commonwealth eBook program, the Commonwealth Catalog (the new virtual catalog), and mass.gov/libraries, which provides information and resources for residents. LSTA is administered on the federal level by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and in the Commonwealth by the MBLC.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.