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Historic Preservation

The Office of Historic Preservation is responsible for promoting and protecting the City of Boston's historic built heritage. The department houses the Boston Landmarks Commission, the City Archaeology Program and the Commemoration Commission. Together, our teams raise awareness on the environmental, social, and economic benefits of our historic resources. 

We also promote the benefits of adaptive reuse of historic buildings and materials. Our department fosters economic development and cultural diversity by protecting and advocating for Boston's unique sense of place.  

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Department Divisions

Department Divisions
Landmarks Logo
Boston Landmarks Commission

The Landmarks Commission (BLC) and the 10 local historic district commissions are comprised of volunteers nominated by professional organizations and neighborhood groups. The Commissions are tasked with reviewing exterior changes made to properties within their specific jurisdictions. The BLC also regulates the city's Article 85 Demolition Delay ordinance. 

Archaeology logo
Archaeology Program

The City Archaeology Program was founded in 1983. The program's goal is to protect Boston's irreplaceable archaeological resources. Boston has hundreds of known archaeological sites within the City's borders. Archaeology staff curate the archaeological collections at the City’s Archaeology Laboratory. 

Under Construction
Commemoration Commission

The Commemoration Commission is tasked with celebrating the Country's 250th anniversary and the City's 400th Birthday. 

(Coming soon!

Environment, Energy, and Open Space Cabinet

Reverend Mariama White-Hammond is the Chief of Environment, Energy, and Open Space for the City of Boston. In this role, Rev. White-Hammond is responsible for leading the Cabinet in achieving its mission of enhancing environmental justice and quality of life in Boston by protecting air, water, climate, and land resources, as well as preserving and improving the integrity of Boston's architectural and historic resources.

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