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Last updated: 11/9/18

Long Island

Long Island is located in Boston Harbor and is part of the City of Boston.

In 2014, to ensure public safety, Mayor Martin J. Walsh made the decision to close Long Island Bridge. During his January 2018 inaugural address, Mayor Walsh pledged to rebuild the Long Island bridge to create a comprehensive, long-term recovery campus on Long Island. Rebuilding the Bridge and then reopening the Island for recovery services continues Boston's commitment to ensuring a continuum of care for those who suffer from substance use disorders.

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About the project

The rebuilding of Long Island bridge and Mayor Walsh's commitment to creating a recovery campus, which will serve individuals across the entire region, highlights Boston’s work in tackling the national opioid crisis, and its local and regional effects.

BUILDING A NEW BRIDGE

In order to minimize impacts on the seafloor around the bridge, the bridge replacement superstructure component will be assembled offsite and then floated into place on barges.

The new bridge will be similar to the original 1951 bridge. There will be one lane in each direction and sidewalks, as well as an open channel for boats below. The design and materials from the original bridge will be updated to ensure a longer-lasting structure that will last for decades.

FILLING THE GAPS

Recovery service providers in Boston have emphasized the need to fill existing gaps in the continuum of care, or the array of services offered to those in each stage of recovery from addiction. Particularly for those who may have co-occurring disorders and are battling behavioral health issues alongside addiction, ensuring that the individual is supported fully throughout recovery is critical.

ENVISIONING A RECOVERY CAMPUS

Mayor Walsh has committed to recovery services being part of the future of Long Island and saw the potential the location had to be a peaceful setting for those in recovery.

Boston will be able to expand essential recovery resources in a serene setting, and provide services spanning the whole continuum of care such as harm reduction, detox, residential treatment, transitional housing and ongoing peer support.

The positive impact of a recovery campus will be felt far and wide. It will take those suffering from substance disorders off the streets, not only of Boston but also of Quincy and all our neighboring cities and towns. More importantly, it will help them return to their families and communities more whole and better equipped to continue rebuilding their lives.

Mayor Martin J. Walsh

Project timeline

JANUARY 1, 2018

Mayor Walsh pledged to rebuild the Long Island bridge to create a comprehensive, long-term recovery campus on Long Island.

MAY 2, 2018

The City of Boston submits Notice of Intent submitted to the Boston Conservation Commission.

MAY 16, 2018

The City of Boston presents to Boston Conservation Commission at hearing.

MAY 17, 2018

The City of Boston submits Notice of Intent to the Quincy Conservation Commission.

JUNE 6, 2018

Boston Conservation Commission approves the City of Boston’s Notice of Intent and issues a Wetlands Permit

JUNE 6, 2018

The City of Boston presents to the Quincy Conservation Commission (QCC).

JULY 31, 2018

The City of Boston files Notice of Project Change with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office.

AUGUST 1, 2018

The City of Boston is present at Quincy Conservation Commission hearing #2; no quorum for the project.

SEPTEMBER 5, 2018

The City of Boston attends the Quincy Conservation Commission hearing for the third time and presents. The Quincy Conservation Commission verbally denies the City of Boston Notice of Intent.

SEPTEMBER 21, 2018

City of Boston receives MEPA certificate to continue in comprehensive state permitting process.

SEPTEMBER 25, 2018

The City of Boston receives written denial from the City of Quincy on Notice of Intent.

OCTOBER 2, 2018

City officials testify at Boston City Council hearing to examine plans regarding reconstruction of the Long Island Bridge and the reopening of service facilities.

OCTOBER 5, 2018

The City of Boston released a Request for Information (RFI) to inform the planning of a comprehensive, long-term recovery campus on Long Island.

October 9, 2018

In response to the Quincy Conservation Commission's denial under the state Wetlands Protection Act, the City of Boston files Request for Superseding Order of Conditions with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).

Map of bridge location

Common questions

Questions

The bridge originally opened in 1951 and was closed on an emergency basis in 2014, following long-running concerns about the structural integrity of the Bridge. The superstructure of the bridge was removed in 2015 with the support of all relevant federal, state, and local permitting agencies.

Long Island has hosted many services in the past. Most recently, the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) provided social services including shelters for individuals experiencing homelessness and treatment facilities for individuals suffering from substance use disorders.

Since the emergency closing of the bridge, all 742 shelter beds and all 225 recovery beds from Long Island were replaced, with additional capacity for both the homeless and recovery communities.

Boston will invest $80 million in new funding to rebuild the bridge to Long Island, for a total of $92 million towards towards the project.

Yes. The design of the bridge will be similar to the original 1951 bridge — comprised of one vehicle lane in each direction, sidewalks, and an open channel for boats below.

Construction is scheduled to take 3 years to complete. In order to minimize impacts on the seafloor and neighborhood abutters, the new superstructure will be largely assembled offsite and then floated into place on barges.

Yes. The design and construction calls for the use of 13 of the existing 15 piers. The bridge span will be built atop those piers. Utilizing the existing piers will further reduce impacts to the sea floor.

The City of Boston recognizes that stakeholder engagement and community involvement is a critical piece in the Long Island Bridge Replacement Project. Representatives from our Public Works Department along with our environmental project engineers have presented to the Boston Conservation Commission, Quincy Conservation Commission and the Boston City Council. At each hearing, public testimony played a critical role by providing critical feedback to the City of Boston.

Boston envisions a recovery campus on Long Island that will expand essential recovery resources in a serene setting, and provide services spanning the whole continuum of care such as harm reduction, detox, residential treatment, transitional housing and ongoing peer support.

As a City, we’ve taken a comprehensive approach, serving people in all stages of the continuum of care, from providing harm reduction services to ensure people can maintain health in various aspects of their lives, to connecting people with beds at rehabilitation facilities, to offering inpatient and outpatient programming, to long-term peer support for those further along in their recovery journey.

City services include:

Providing Access to Addictions Treatments, Hope and Support (PAATHS): a one-stop shop program for anyone looking for information and referrals to substance use treatment. The program offers information and/or access to treatment through 24-hour phone support through Boston 311, community support and walk-in services.

Access, Harm Reduction, Overdose Prevention and Education (AHOPE): a harm reduction and needle exchange site providing a range of service to active injection drug users, including integrated HIV/ Hepatitis/ and STI testing; free, legal, and anonymous needle exchange; supported referrals to HIV, Hepatitis, STI treatment, and medical; overdose prevention education and training; risk reduction supplies to reduce the spread of HIV and Hepatitis C infection; risk reduction counseling; and supported referrals to all modalities of substance abuse treatment.

Overdose prevention: the Mayor’s Office of Recovery Services provides ongoing overdose prevention and intervention training for community members and city employees.

Engagement center: provides a safe and comfortable place for people who experience homelessness and addiction to spend time and connect to services. Visitors can receive on-site medical care, and be referred to recovery and housing programs.